DR. ANDREW DELATOLLA

Lecturer in Middle Eastern Studies
School of Languages, Cultures and Societies –

Arabic, Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies
University of Leeds

 

Visiting Research Fellow
Middle East Centre
London School of Economics and Political Science

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PEER REVIEWED ARTICLES

Andrew has previously written on issues of state formation in Lebanon, using a Tilly-esque approach to understand the Lebanese Civil War as conductive to the state formation process; how civil war dynamics in Lebanon are reproduced thanks to general amnesty and power sharing agreements; how religion has been racialised from the nineteenth century to today; and how sexuality has been, and continues to be, used to measure global civilisational engagement. His current and developing project questions how the use of sexual violence by state forces during periods of internal crisis impacts citizenship, national belonging, and statehood.

 

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Dr. Andrew Delatolla is a Lecturer in Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Leeds and currently a Visiting Research Fellow at the Middle East Centre at the London School of Economics and Political Science. After finishing his PhD in 2018 in the Department of International Relations at the LSE, he was employed as an Assistant Professor of International Relations in the Department of Political Science at the American University in Cairo. Andrew is the former Chair of the LGBTQA+ Caucus of the International Studies Association.

 

His research interests centre on issues of race, gender, and sexuality in relation to statehood and state formation. His research focuses on issues of violence and exclusion from an international historical political sociological lens, examining the international relations of the Middle East and North Africa (Egypt, Lebanon, Syria, Turkey, and the Ottoman Empire).

Sexuality as a Standard of Civilization: Historicizing (Homo)Colonial Intersections of Race, Gender, and Class

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The Lebanese Civil War and post-conflict power sharing: Continuation of conflict dynamics in post-conflict environments

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Racializing Religion: Constructing Colonial Identities in the Syrian Provinces in the Nineteenth Century

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War and state formation in Lebanon: can Tilly be applied to the developing world?

 

BOOK

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Civilization and the Making of the State in Lebanon and Syria

This book argues that the modern state, from the nineteenth century to the contemporary period, has consistently been used as a means to measure civilizational engagement and attainment. This volume historicizes this dynamic, examining how it impacted state-making in Lebanon and Syria. By putting social, political, and economic pressure on the Ottoman Empire to replicate the modern state in Europe, the book examines processes of racialization, nationalist development, continued imperial expansion, and resistance that became embedded in the state as it was assembled. By historicizing post-imperial and post-colonial state formation in Lebanon and Syria, it is possible to engage in a conceptual separation from the modern state, abandoning the ongoing reproduction of the state as a standard, or benchmark, of civilization and progress.

 
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contact

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DR. ANDREW DELATOLLA

UNIVERSITY OF LEEDS, GB.

Room No.    PAN.10.01

LANGUAGES:

English, French, Arabic

KEY EXPERTISE:

Middle East, Politics, International Relations, Conflict, State Formation, Race, Gender, and Sexuality

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